American Roulette

American Roulette
American Roulette

Your search for the right Roulette table at a casino will likely bring you to an American Roulette table. The game of Roulette may have been developed in France but it quickly made its way over to the United States. American gamblers in the 19th century sought to make Roulette more difficult by changing the wheel and layout. The slight differences between American, French and European Roulette are due as much to the history of these games as rule variations.

The primary difference between American Roulette and its European counterpart is the wheel. The European Roulette wheel utilizes a single green space for zero that has been custom since the 19th century. American Roulette tables have used double-zero wheels since their introduction in the early 19th century. The double-zero wheel is actually an original version of the Roulette wheel used by French gamblers in 1796. American casinos benefit from a higher house advantage using the double-zero wheel compared to the single-zero wheel. The house advantage is 5.60% for a double-zero wheel to a weaker 2.70% advantage for European Roulette tables. The wheel features numbers one through 36 but has 38 numbers overall due to the second green space.

The layout of an American Roulette table is easy to assess for casual players. The wheel is located at one end of the table while the other end features the betting layout. You will see three columns of numbers that represent the various red and black spaces on the wheel. You can choose any of these numbers individually or place chips between numbers to enhance your chances. The exterior of the three columns includes spaces for outside bets. These spaces cover the gamut of outside betting options including selecting an entire column and choosing between red or black.

American Roulette
American Roulette

The evolution of American Roulette has come from the unique locales that adopted the game's rules. The entry point for Roulette into the United States was New Orleans, a former French port that reflected the culture's interest in gaming. The game moved north along the Mississippi River and east along the Gulf Coast to gaming facilities throughout the Southeast. The gaming industry was restricted to riverboat casinos and informal games until the 20th century. American Roulette really found its legs among avid gamblers with new tables in Las Vegas and Atlantic City. Las Vegas casinos sprang up after World War II and currently feature some of the most popular tables in the world. Atlantic City has been building casinos since the 1970s that utilize American Roulette rules for their tables.

American Roulette has been used by online casinos for years in tandem with European Roulette. These casinos are interested in broadening their consumer base despite gaming preferences. This duality also allows a player familiar with American Roulette to test out European Roulette rules. European Roulette is often considered a gateway to American Roulette due to the slightly more favorable odds to players. The double-zero wheel used in the American version of Roulette can be a step up for European players. American Roulette can be seen as a stepping stone to the call bets and complexities of French Roulette.

Players in the United States can only play American Roulette through foreign casinos as of August 2010. The federal government prohibited American-based online casinos in the 1990s as a consumer protection measure. Advancements in online casino technology along with industry measures to ensure responsible gambling have made this prohibition seem outdated. The U.S. Congress will debate reversing the prohibition on online casinos in 2011 in an effort to regulate and tax the industry. Online casinos based in the United States would no doubt honor the nation's gaming tradition by promoting American Roulette games.